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Bankhead's Battery Official

5 days 7 hours ago

It's Official. Bankheads Battery will be leading a 5 gun Confederate Battery known as Army of Teneesee to join with the Army of Northern Virginia in Gettysburg, PA for the 155th Anniversary on July 5-9, 2018. Anyone wanting to enlist?

Bankhead's Battery Official

1 week 2 days ago

Bankhead's Battery Official updated their cover photo.

Bankhead's Battery Official

2 weeks 2 days ago

Bankhead's Battery Official updated their cover photo.

Bankhead's Battery Official

3 weeks 4 days ago

Bankhead's Battery Official updated their cover photo.

Bankhead's Battery Official

3 weeks 5 days ago

We are happy to announce a tremendous accomplishment by Duffy and Turners Battery making the Starkville Arsenal a singular World Class Civil War Museum in our own backyard. Below copied their announcement:
"Attention all, it gives me great pleasure to announce another Turner's first and only! Duffy has completed his ambulance! This completes his collection, every piece of rolling stock used by light artillery is under one roof and belongs to Duffy. This is the only complete collection in the world! This is the only period correct Ambulance in the world!!!! What an accomplishment for Duffy, so I am proud to announce it to our members and our friends! Please follow his progress on the Starkville Civil War Arsenal web site from beginning to end. I am sure he is looking forward to everyone's next visit to the museum so you may admire the latest arrival. Pictures are on the Arsenal web site or are being loaded as we speak. More to come in the future for Turner's Battery"

Bankhead's Battery Official

1 month 4 days ago

It's not too early to start planning 2018 schedules

1st Division/Southern Re-enactors Association Announcement / Press Release.
Mississippi Stands Civil War Re-enactment
The 1st Division/Southern Re-enactors Association is pleased to announce the following national event, Mississippi Stands. This is an event that will feature some of the vital Historic Battles for the control of Mississippi and border states. These Battles will take place on nearly 2000 acres of Historic Battlefield located at Brice’s Crossroads in Baldwyn, Mississippi. The date set for the event is February 22 thru 25, 2018. The 1st Division welcomes all re-enactors and organizations to attend this historic event.
Battles: There will be both campaign style battles along with spectator battles.
Camps: There will be mainstream, campaign and civilian camps for everyone.
More information will be forthcoming in the near future.
Thank you for your consideration in preserving a part of our American history.
1st Division/Southern Re-enactors Association

Bankhead's Battery Official

1 month 1 week ago

President Donald Trump donated his entire first-quarter White House salary of $78,333.32 to fund restoration projects at Antietam National Battlefield in Maryland, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced Wednesday.

The money will restore an historic house on the battlefield and help replace fencing at the national park, which preserves and commemorates the site of the bloodiest day of the Civil War, the Washington Times reported.

Bankhead's Battery Official

1 month 3 weeks ago

Bankhead's Battery Official updated their cover photo.

Bankhead's Battery Official

2 months 4 days ago

Bankhead's Battery Official updated their cover photo.

Bankhead's Battery Official

2 months 2 weeks ago

Some candid pics from the 2017 Battle of Sacramento, KY

Bankhead's Battery Official

2 months 2 weeks ago

Bankhead's Battery Official updated their cover photo.

Bankhead's Battery Official

2 months 2 weeks ago

Bankhead's Battery Official shared Shiloh National Military Park's post.

Confederate Artillery at Shiloh: Bankhead’s Tennessee Battery

In April of 1861, although Tennessee had not seceded from the Union, Governor Isham Harris was calling for an Army to defend the state. In response, Smith P. Bankhead, a 37-year-old Memphis lawyer, began forming an artillery company on May 13, 1861. The unit intended to become battery B of the 1st Tennessee Artillery Corps, became known as Bankhead’s Battery. It could well have been called the lawyers battery, since Bankhead was joined by fellow lawyers, W.Y.C. Humes, who was made 1st Lieutenant and J. C. McDavitt , 2nd Lieutenant.

Two days later on May 15, 1861, a young 20-year-old lawyer William B. Greenlaw joined Bankhead as 2nd Lieutenant. Fifty-two additional men were recruited throughout the month of May. On June 4, 1861, Tennessee seceded from the Union and William L. Scott, another lawyer from Memphis, joined Bankhead’s Battery as a 2nd Lieutenant. These officers and the 54 men made up the nucleus of the Battery and moved to Fort Pillow for artillery training although they had no cannon of their own.

Smith Pyne Bankhead was born on August 20, 1823, at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina. His father, General James Bankhead was a career army officer from Virginia. During the Mexican War, Smith P. Bankhead was a Captain of the Virginia Volunteers and served under his father who was commanded American troops stationed at Vera Cruz, Mexico. After the Mexican war, Bankhead was presented a sword by his country for “Gallant Service.” He went to California during the gold rush, and then settled at Memphis in 1851.

In Memphis, Bankhead became involved in politics and was known as a Mexican War hero. He founded and edited the Memphis Whig, a party newspaper. He was elected the City Attorney of Memphis in 1852 and started a private law practice in the 1850’s. One of his brothers, Henry Clay Bankhead, graduated from West Point in 1850 and remained in the U.S. Army during the Civil War. Another brother, John P. Bankhead entered the U.S. Navy at age 17 and remained with the Union. He commanded the U.S.S. Monitor when it sank on December 31, 1862. He survived the sinking and was the last man to abandon the ship. His cousin was Confederate Gen. John Bankhead Magruder.

In July 1861, Bankhead’s Battery received six artillery pieces (6 pounders and 12 pound howitzers) made at the Quinby and Robinson foundry in Memphis. The battery was moved from Fort Pillow to New Madrid, Missouri where they recruited enough men to fill up the battery. In October 1861 they moved to Columbus, Kentucky where they became part of Gen. Leonidas Polk’s Corp. In March 1862, they joined the Confederate forces gathering at Corinth, Mississippi, and Bankhead was promoted to Chief of Artillery for Polk’s Corp. During the Battle of Shiloh, Bankhead would remain with his battery during the battle, despite this promotion.

As the battle of Shiloh started on April 6, 1862, Bankhead’s Battery joined batteries from other Corps on a ridge south of Sherman’s camps at 10:00 AM. Gen. Patrick Cleburne had ordered the Confederate artillery to wake up the Union camps from that positon earlier in the morning. After Sherman was outflanked and retreated with Gen. John McClernand’s Division to Jones Field, the battery moved north to a location near McClerands former headquarters. That afternoon their six guns contributed to the mass of Confederate artillery known as Ruggle’s Battery, after Gen. Daniel Ruggles, which bombarded the Union center contributing to Confederate victory on April 6th. On April 7, 1862, the battle would turn against the Confederates as Gen. Don Carlos Buell’s army arrived to reinforce Grant. Among those arrivals was Smith Bankhead’s brother, Captain Henry Bankhead, on Buell’s staff as inspector of infantry. On the afternoon of April 7, Bankhead’s Battery would form near Shiloh Church as part of the last Confederate defense line, before retreating to Corinth. The battery suffered two killed and 18 wounded. Although they lost 37 of their 82 horses they were able to retreat with all six of their guns and caissons.

After Shiloh, Bankhead was promoted to Major and transferred to the Trans-Mississippi Department and later became Colonel of Artillery, serving under his cousin Gen. Magruder. Capt. William Scott took command of the battery which served with the Army of Tennessee until over run and captured on November 25, 1863, at the Battle of Missionary Ridge.

Smith Bankhead returned to Memphis in March 1865 after deciding there was no point in continuing the war. He was appointed Deputy City Attorney and Trustee of the Navy Yard in the Reconstruction Government, and was considered a turncoat by former Confederates. In what may be the city of Memphis oldest cold case, Smith Bankhead was assassinated. He was struck down from behind and beaten to death by persons never identified on a main street in the downtown section of the city. He was buried in Elmwood Cemetery in Memphis.

#Shiloh155 #FindYourPark #CivilWar

Bankhead's Battery Official

2 months 3 weeks ago

Bankhead's Battery Official shared Defending the Heritage's photo.

The Origins of Memorial Day-

In the spring of 1866 the Ladies Memorial Association of Columbus, Georgia passed a resolution to set aside one day annually to memorialize the Confederate dead. Additionally, the secretary of the association, Mrs. Charles J. (Mary Ann) Williams was directed to author a letter inviting the ladies in every Southern state to join them in the observance.The letter was written in March of 1866 and sent to all of the principal cities in the South, including Atlanta, Macon, Montgomery, Memphis, Richmond, St. Louis, Alexandria, Columbia, New Orleans, et al.

The date for the holiday was selected by Mrs. Elizabeth Rutherford Ellis. She chose April 26, the first anniversary of Confederate General Johnston's final surrender to Union General Sherman at Bennett Place, NC. For many in the South, that marked the official end of the War.

On April 26, 1866, tens of thousands of Southern women commemorated the first Confederate Memorial Day. Some, however, in the northernmost portions of the South did not participate because their flowers were not yet in bloom. Consequently, they selected dates later in the spring to hold their first Confederate Memorial Days. For example, parts of Virginia chose May 10, commemorating Stonewall Jackson's death. Near Petersburg, VA, they chose June 9, the anniversary of a significant battle there. Others opted for Confederate President Jefferson Davis' birthday, June 3.
To the present, Southern states continue to have Confederate Memorial days. Though most are still on April 26, others continue to be later in the year.

In 1868, Union General John A. Logan, who was the commander in chief of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), launched the US Memorial Day holiday that is currently observed in the entire United States. According to General Logan's wife, he emulated the practices of Confederate Memorial Day. She wrote that Logan "said it was not too late for the Union men of the nation to follow the example of the people of the South in perpetuating the memory of their friends who had died for the cause they thought just and right."

Bankhead's Battery Official

2 months 3 weeks ago

On Monday May 29 Bankhead's Battery will participate in the annual salute to veterans on Memorial Day at Memorial Park. Please join us in remembering those veterans that made the ultimate sacrifice.

Please join us as the local boy scouts, veterans’ organizations, and prominent political figures play key roles in this annual Memorial Day tribute to those who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country. The service will conclude with military honors rendered with a live cannon salute.

Bankhead's Battery Official

2 months 3 weeks ago

Bankhead's Battery Official shared Battle Of Sacramento's photo.

Saturday night dance at this year's Battle of Sacramento was such fun.

Bankhead's Battery Official

2 months 3 weeks ago

Battery,



Orders to move on Sacramento, KY came early in the week with Pvt. Russom and Cpl. McCallister along with their families responding as forward scouts on the18th. With their “common” wagons and families, they went un-noticed as soldiers of the Confederacy reporting numbers and positions of the enemy. By the next day Cpl. Geminn, Pvt. Beard, and Pvt. Barnett had arrived and set camp. The Sergeants all took billet in Madisonville to the west and established communications before unlimbering in the field with Private Robbins as their escort. I along with Pvt. Moore arrived at daylight on the 20th and immediately set camp then reported to headquarters for further orders.



The weather was threatening but was a proper backdrop for what we were about to impart upon the enemy when located. It wasn’t long, fearing no other crew was close we had a plan. We aligned ourselves with Porter’s and Cobb’s Battery on a hill overlooking the town of Sacramento. A young lady from the town, Molly Moore rode out to the General and gave up the enemy position. Our cavalry advanced and drew them into range where opened on them without mercy. With the cavalry and infantry pushing them back north the battle was over just as a threatening storm approached. The storm kept the route to a minimum distance and we were forced not to pursue further. The townspeople fed all and some danced in to the late night as we weary soldiers went to bed.



The following morning at roll call, Pvt. Moore was missing. He had slept in his tent but now was no where to be found. I could not believe that he had skedaddled in the face of the enemy, I just could not believe it. Hearing of the news, Pvt.s Hunter and Hatcher saddled up and raced to our position. But, you know that no one escapes the Sgt. Major. Pvt. Moore was located at the field hospital to our west where the Sgt. Major returned him briskly to the front upon his release. On his report, he stated that had gotten up in the middle of the night to visit the sink and was captured by who he knew not. He never saw his assailant but they must have strangled him because he could not breathe. The Provost called for an ambulance and he was taken to the field hospital in Madisonville where he was treated and released to Sgt. Maj. Douglas. Pvt. Moore now wears a neck tag with instructions to return him if found to Bankheads Battery.



The following day, the cavalry found the enemy again and pushed them hard. The sounds of the battle called us to our guns and the infantry out of camp. This time there shall be no saving them. The onslaught was too much and the enemy that still had their lives ran so far and fast that the “hounds couldn’t catch’em”. Having establish our presence in Kentucky, the artillery was relieved to return to post. The Batteries were loaded and pulled out on the 21st. It is to my knowledge that all returned safely home as I had in my possession Pvt. Moore to keep me company whilst I kept a close eye.



Your obedient servant,



Capt. H. Cohea

Bankheads Battery Co. B

1st Tennessee Light Artillery

Attached – Forrest’s Cavalry

Bankhead's Battery Official

2 months 4 weeks ago

A night in camp.

Bankhead's Battery Official

3 months 35 minutes ago

Night night.

Bankhead's Battery Official

3 months 4 hours ago

Where Is everybody?

Bankhead's Battery Official

3 months 13 hours ago

Friday morning

Bankhead's Battery Official

3 months 3 weeks ago

Don't forget to check us out on Instagram...if that's your app of choice! We're now posting pics on there as well! Just search for Bankhead's Battery!

Bankhead's Battery Official

4 months 3 days ago

Ordinance Sgt. Rivenbark says it was great to see that Sgt. Major Lantz had not slipped in the slightest in making sure to fulfill his responsibilities as first watch in camp. 😉

Bankhead's Battery Official

4 months 6 days ago

Photos should be coming in over the coming days. For now, here is the action report via Captain Cohea:

Battery,

Let me begin with I take extreme pleasure to make my report that Bankheads Battery, designated as Battery “A” for the campaign attached to Army of the West, was the best battery on the field and has received honors for their performance under fire. I received several personal commendations from artillery command, infantry units, as well as “captured” union infantry for our performance. I personally would like to thank and congratulate the attached units of Huggins Battery and Stanford’s Battery for their performance within our unit for when I speak of Bankheads Battery I am speaking of you and your members also. It was my pleasure to be in command of such a unit. Colonel Beams has requested that our assemble Batteries under his command for this campaign in the future be given the top preference for any future campaigns from the Army of the West solely due to your performance.

Bankheads Battery was called upon to commit our Battery for service under the command of Colonel Robert Beams and report to a field southeast of Pittsburg Landing to be known as Shiloh for a strike of force against the enemy assembling there. Our Battery Wagon and first gun arrived on the field the 5th of April accompanied by myself, Sgt. Major Lantz, and Ord. Sgt. Rivenbark to begin setting camp. We were quickly attached to Artillery Reserve, Army of the West commanded by General Jack King and designated as Battery A under Col. Beams. Three more Batteries would soon be assembled forming our Reserve Battalion.

It was evident that I, being placed in overall command of the complete Battery “A” would need to restructure the Battery command for its operation. Private Oliver was promoted to acting Lieutenant in command of the left section and Corporal Geminn was promoted to acting Lieutenant in command of the right section. Ordnance Sgt. Rivenbark was promoted to 1st Sgt. and was dispatched back to scout the advance of our other guns and crews enroute returning on the 7th. By the 6th of April, the Battery would begin to take form with the arrival of our second gun with Lt. Oliver and Private Douglas. Further assignments being deemed necessary, Private Douglas was field promoted to permanent Battery Sargent Major with the out-going Sgt. Major Lantz being promoted as my Aide de’ Camp. Feeling the need to ensure our safe and righteous cause, Private Robert Hatcher accepted the position of Battery Chaplain and was presented with the appropriate collar insignia signifying his post. I will add that no member of the Battery should feel uncomfortable in his presence as he was later observed running a card game and I received complaints from Pvt. Hunter he had attempted to fold it quickly after winning considerably.

On the 7th of April, Huggins Battery’s two guns arrived and was placed in park completing our four gun battery we were charged with assembling. Corporal Phineas and Pvt. Lane with welcome, joined our camp but was attached to McClung’s assigned to Battery “B”. Corporal Kelsey with the “Home Guard” arrived feeling the fray was too close for comfort and joined us. Private James Moore was billeted in town south of our position as our rear picket in report to command. He brought along a young recruit named Joshua that he found along the way and was quickly thrown into a uniform and pressed into service performing superbly as our “powder monkey”. The Section Commanders assigned Pvt. Billings, Cpl. Kelsey, Sgt. Maj. Douglas, and Cpl. McCallister as chief of their assigned piece who performed admirably under fire and with no casualties to their crews on the field.



By the evening of the 7th, we were disturbed in camp by the sounds of an erupting battle to our west. Pickets were sent out to discover that we had made contact with our enemy. We watched as columns of infantry, horse-drawn artillery with their baggage wagons pulled out of camp toward the fray. They battled into the night and silenced. With our ears-a-perched upon our heads, we settled down for sleep knowing this was the calm before the storm. Battle erupted again at daylight as our boys pushed the enemy into and beyond their camps where they took their morning breakfast from yankee pots. A number of our members acquired numerous items while there also.


I knew that though attached as “Artillery Reserve”, it would not last. We were called to make ready the guns by 3:00pm. Our Horse Artillery had already come into action with the union artillery and captured one of their guns drawing back to our position. Battery “A” was the first to come on line wheeling the guns ourselves from the cover of woods and onto the field. I have never seen our Battery with such determination in their faces coming into line and was proud to be first and best onto the field. As soon as our four guns were in operation within 4 minutes we quickly put the captured union gun to use within our own battery against the enemy giving us five. We identified a point of woods containing the union forces and concentrated our fire there. Our sister Batteries arrived one after one on the line we established until our battalion was fully engaged into a virtual “Hornet’s Nest”. Our infantry joined us on our flanks and after 2 hours of fighting, the enemy could stand no more causing them to withdraw. Ordnance reported our combined 17 guns of the day had poured in 362 rounds. We retired to camp holding our established line and no wounds to lick….just busted breast coat buttons with pride.

The following morning, there was great concern among command over plans to continue the attack pushing the enemy into the river. We were called to advance our guns ¼ mile further into another field for action. As soon as they were in position and before we could get all of our guns online the battle erupted by 1:00 pm. There would be a great turning point today as our intentions were thwarted by the arrival of fresh enemy reinforcements landing overnight and into the morning. We were only able to get Battery “A” and Turner’s 1st Mississippi Battery ‘B” in position before it began. Our infantry attacked and it was all we could do to support their efforts. Seeing we were out gunned on the field the horse-drawn came to aid on our immediate left flank. The firing was continuous with cavalry charges probing their lines for an opening. We had enough time to observe our support and came to the conclusion that though they were pretty with their horses and polished guns, Bankheads could out-gun and out fight them on any field based on what we saw. The adrenaline was so fierce I had to approach our line and restrain some of our men to conserve their energy more than once. When it was determined that we had to abandon our efforts, all withdrew following Aide de’ Camp Lantz with the colors to the rear. Being fearful the enemy might continue their charge, we quickly rolled up our camp and made our way from the field with no battle casualties or loss of guns.

I want to commend my Section Commanders Oliver and Geminn, for a job well done. 1st Sgt. Rivenbark supported our every needs even when both he and Sgt. Maj. Douglas were called to the guns. Our Battery received honors for their performance over the three days action and I will say I have never led a more courageous group with such pride. This is my report for our actions at 155th Shiloh.



Your obedient servant respectfully,



Captain Hilton Cohea

Bankheads Battery

1st Tennessee Light Artillery

Bankhead's Battery Official

4 months 1 week ago

Bankhead's Battery Official updated their cover photo.